Astrogeology Science Center

North Polar Layered Deposits in Head Scarp of Chasma Boreale
North Polar Layered Deposits in Head Scarp of Chasma Boreale
Icy Northern Dunes
Icy Northern Dunes
Flood-Emplaced Blocks in Holden Crater
Flood-Emplaced Blocks in Holden Crater

The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) is an instrument flying on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) mission, launched August 12, 2005. The HiRISE camera will collect thousands of images of Mars' surface in unprecedented detail, allowing researchers to see objects as small as one meter (a little over a yard). This impressive collection of new and exciting imagery will allow scientists, engineers, and cartographers to investigate and learn much more about the Red Planet than ever before.

Former and current USGS Astrogeology Research Program personnel who are members of the HiRISE Science and Instrument Team include Alfred McEwen, (University of Arizona, Principal Investigator), Ken Herkenhoff (USGS, Co-Investigator, polar geology coordinator, calibration lead), Eric Eliason (University of Arizona, manager of HiRISE operations center), Randolph Kirk (USGS, Co-Investigator, geodesy, geometric calibration, and topographic mapping lead), and Laszlo Keszthelyi (USGS, Co-Investigator, local E/PO lead, volcanology coordinator).

Current USGS Astrogeology Research Program personnel who are members of the HiRISE software development team include Jeff Anderson, Kris Becker, Stuart Sides and Jim Torson. The Programming group is providing software for the University of Arizona HiRISE Ground Data System (GDS) processing. This involves importing the images into the Isis image processing package, radiometric calibration and geometric projection capabilities.