Astrogeology Science Center

Lillian R. Ostrach is a planetary scientist at the USGS Astrogeology Science Center. Lillian earned a dual bachelor's degree in Geological and Biological Sciences from Brown University in 2007, a master's degree in Geological Sciences from Brown University in 2008, and a Ph.D. in Geological Sciences from Arizona State University in 2013. Prior to joining the USGS in 2016, she was a NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellow at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Lillian is an active member of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera science team. Her research is focused on comparative planetology of airless bodies, with particular emphasis on the impact cratering process/products and volcanism on the Moon and Mercury. She uses a variety of integrated remote sensing datasets to conduct research, employing methods of impact crater measurements, stratigraphy, and geomorphology to infer the formation and evolutionary history of different terrains on the Moon and Mercury. In addition to her scientific research, Lillian greatly enjoys public outreach and education, frequently participating in both formal and informal events to increase understanding, appreciation, and excitement of planetary science to the general public.

Education

  • Ph.D. 2013, Arizona State University; Geological Sciences
    • Dissertation: Impact-Related Processes on Mercury and the Moon (Advisor: M.S. Robinson)
  • Sc.M. 2008, Brown University; Geological Sciences
    • Thesis: In Depth Analysis of Lobate Debris Aprons in the Northern Mid-Latitudes of Mars in an Attempt to Understand Their Formation, Evolution, and Developmental Processes (Advisor: J.W. Head)
  • Sc.B. 2007, Brown University; Geological-Biological Sciences
    • Honors Thesis: Formation and Evolution of Lobate Debris Aprons during the Late Amazonian on Mars: Evidence for Recent Global Climate Change (Advisor: J.W. Head)

General Research Interests

*Impact cratering processes and products on airless bodies including crater morphology, impact melt morphology, distribution, and assessment of melt-generation models, regolith generation and evolution, and relative and absolute dating using crater size-frequency distributions.
*Planetary volcanism, including timing of emplacement, mode of emplacement, and compositional variation for smooth plains regions on solid surface bodies.
*Comparative planetology of airless bodies using remote sensing data: Recent data sets, including those from active space flight missions, provide the opportunity to complete comparative geomorphological studies of the four main planetary processes (i.e., impact cratering, volcanism, tectonics, and gradation) at high-resolution and with orbital coverage that was previously unavailable.
*Methods-based applications to planetary remote sensing data: Integration of multiple remote sensing data sets for planetary geomorphological studies, development of new tools, methods, and techniques for the production of cartographic products and creation of high-precision, high-accuracy geologic maps, controlled mosaics, digital terrain models, and other products for the scientific community, improving methods and geospatial information system (GIS) techniques for processing and analyzing remotely sensed data and planetary-specific scientific analyses, including developing novel statistical approaches from observations/measurements obtained from remotely sensed data (e.g., areal crater density derived crater size-frequency distributions to identify age-units in volcanic smooth plains).
  • Impact cratering processes and products on airless bodies
    • Crater morphology; impact melt morphology, distribution, and assessment of melt-generation models; regolith generation and evolution; and relative and absolute dating using crater size-frequency distributions
  • Planetary volcanism
    • Timing of emplacement, mode of emplacement, and compositional variation for smooth plains regions on solid surface bodies
  • Comparative planetology of airless bodies using remote sensing data
    • Recent data sets, including those from active space flight missions, provide the opportunity to complete comparative geomorphological studies of the four main planetary processes (i.e., impact cratering, volcanism, tectonics, and gradation) at high-resolution and with orbital coverage that was previously unavailable
  • Methods-based applications to planetary remote sensing data
    • Integration of multiple remote sensing data sets for planetary geomorphological studies, development of new tools, methods, and techniques for the production of cartographic products and creation of high-precision, high-accuracy geologic maps, controlled mosaics, digital terrain models, and other products for the scientific community, improving methods and geospatial information system (GIS) techniques for processing and analyzing remotely sensed data and planetary-specific scientific analyses, including developing novel statistical approaches from observations/measurements obtained from remotely sensed data (e.g., areal crater density derived crater size-frequency distributions to identify age-units in volcanic smooth plains)

Research and Professional Experience

  • 2018–present Research Physical Scientist, U.S. Geological Survey, Astrogeology Science Center
  • 2016–2018 Phyiscal Scientist, Eugene M. Shoemaker Fellow, U.S. Geological Survey, Astrogeology Science Center
  • 2014–2016 NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellow, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
  • 2013 Graduate Teaching Assistant, Arizona State University
  • 2008–2013 Graduate Research Associate, Arizona State University
  • 2007–2008 Graduate Research Assistant, Brown University
  • 2006–2007 Undergraduate Teaching/Research Assisstant, Brown University

Missions

  • Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera
    • Science Team Affiliate (2014–present)
    • Science Team (2008–2013)
  • MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, Gravity, and Ranging (MESSENGER)
    • Visiting Investigator (2014–2016)
    • Science Team (2008–2013)

Field Workshops and Short Courses

August 2016 - LROC Science Team Meeting and Field Trip to The Big Island, Hawai’i - The field component of this meeting focused on cinder cones, pits, lava tubes, and lava flows that could serve as analogs to lunar features. Collection of high-resolution image data from which digital terrain models could be derived for several cinder cones and pits were taken, for comparison to lunar features such as the Marius Hills and observed lunar pits. Additionally, some of this field data should aid in better understanding the processes that could be responsible for formation of the Irregular Mare Patches.
July 2015 - LROC Science Team Meeting and Field Trip to Ries Crater, Nordlingen, Germany - The field component of this meeting focused on the geology of the Ries impact structure and how field research is completed when the feature of interest is very old, degradation and erosion have taken place (e.g., the geology is nowhere near pristine), and where human influence has affected the integrity of the geology (e.g., the city of Nordlingen was built during Medieval times within the crater; suevite was used to build many buildings, etc.).
October 2012 - USRA/CLRN Short Course and Field School at the Sudbury Impact Structure, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada - This competitive field course focused on introducing basin- scale impact cratering processes through field observations at the Sudbury impact structure. Participants mapped shatter cone distributions within and surrounding the Sudbury structure, the results of which were presented in an abstract at the Large Meteorite Impacts and Planetary Evolution V meeting.
October 2010 - USRA Field Training and Research Program at Meteor Crater, Meteor Crater, Arizona - This competitive course introduced students to impact cratering processes by conducting field measurements at Barringer Meteor Crater.
  • August 2016 - LROC Science Team Meeting and Field Trip to The Big Island, Hawai’i
    • The field component of this meeting focused on cinder cones, pits, lava tubes, and lava flows that could serve as analogs to lunar features. Collection of high-resolution image data from which digital terrain models could be derived for several cinder cones and pits were taken, for comparison to lunar features such as the Marius Hills and observed lunar pits. Additionally, some of this field data should aid in better understanding the processes that could be responsible for formation of the Irregular Mare Patches.
  • July 2015 - LROC Science Team Meeting and Field Trip to Ries Crater, Nördlingen, Germany
    • The field component of this meeting focused on the geology of the Ries impact structure and how field research is completed when the feature of interest is very old, degradation and erosion have taken place (e.g., the geology is nowhere near pristine), and where human influence has affected the integrity of the geology (e.g., the city of Nordlingen was built during Medieval times within the crater; suevite was used to build many buildings, etc.).
  • October 2012 - USRA/CLRN Short Course and Field School at the Sudbury Impact Structure, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada
    • This competitive field course focused on introducing basin- scale impact cratering processes through field observations at the Sudbury impact structure. Participants mapped shatter cone distributions within and surrounding the Sudbury structure, the results of which were presented in an abstract at the Large Meteorite Impacts and Planetary Evolution V meeting.
  • October 2010 - USRA Field Training and Research Program at Meteor Crater, Meteor Crater, Arizona
    • This competitive course introduced students to impact cratering processes by conducting field measurements at Barringer Meteor Crater. The field work developed skills for investigations in impact cratered terrains on other planetary bodies, with particular emphasis on the Moon, Mars, and Earth. Participants conducted research to determine the distribution of ejecta lithologies and fold hinge displacement in Coconino sandstone, culminating in two abstracts presented at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference.
  • July 2010 - NASA Planetary Volcanology Workshop, The Big Island, Hawai’i
    • This competitive workshop focused on the use of Hawaiian volcanoes and volcanic features as analogs for investigating volcanic features on other planetary bodies, specifically the Moon, Mars, and Venus. The field-based course gave participants field experience studying volcanic features in Volcanoes National Park, including lava tubes, lava channels, fissures, skylights and pits, cinder cones, and active lava flows. The course culminated in an exercise where participants ground-truthed a map they made using remote sensing data prior to attending the workshop.

Keywords

Moon, Mercury, Impact Cratering, , Volcanism, Geomorphology, Geology, Planetary Surface Processes, Comparative Planetology, GIS, LRO, MESSENGER

Honors and Awards

  • 2018  LEAG Bernard Ray (B. Ray) Hawke Next Lunar Generation Career Development Award
  • 2018  NASA Group Achievement Award, MESSENGER Mission Team, Mercury Orbital Operations and Science
  • 2018  USGS Peer Award (March)
  • 2017  USGS Performance Award (November)
  • 2017  USGS Group Award (September)
  • 2017  USGS Leadership Coins (internal USGS Leadership Award; March, August)
  • 2017  NASA Certificate of Appreciation, Contributions to the 2017 Total Solar Eclipse
  • 2016  Shoemaker Fellowship, USGS Astrogeology Science Center
  • 2015  NASA Group Achievement Award, LRO Extended Science Mission Team
  • 2015  NASA Science Innovation Fund, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Co-Investigator
  • 2014  NASA Group Achievement Award, LRO Education and Public Outreach Team
  • 2013  NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellowship, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
  • 2013  Smithsonian Institution Fellowship
  • 2013  R.H. Goddard Exceptional Achievement for Science - Team, LRO Science Mission Team
  • 2012  ASU Graduate and Professional Student Association Professional Development Grant
  • 2011  NASA Group Achievement Award, Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Exploration Mission 
  • 2011  NASA Group Achievement Award, LRO Missions Operations Team
  • 2011  ASU Graduate and Professional Student Association Travel Grant
  • 2011  Geological Society of America Student Travel Grant
  • 2011  ASU School of Earth and Space Exploration Rock Star Geology Award
  • 2010  NASA Group Achievement Award, Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Team
  • 2010  School of Earth and Space Exploration Graduate Student Merit Award
  • 2010  ASU Graduate and Professional Student Association Professional Development Grant
  • 2007  Rhode Island Space Grant Summer Student Scholarship
  • 2007  Induction into Sigma Xi, Brown University Chapter
  • 2006  Undergraduate Teaching/Research Assistantship, Brown University
  • 2004  Federal Employee Education and Assistance Fund Scholarship
  • Selected Invited Presentations

  • 2016  USGS Astrogeology Science Center, Flagstaff, AZ
  • 2016  National Science Week, Twydall Primary School, Kent, UK (interactive webinar)
  • 2016  STEM@NASA, Women’s History Month, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/84506890)
  • 2015  Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH
  • 2015  Dr. J.G. Cigarroa Middle School, Laredo, TX (interactive webinar)
  • 2015  STEMfest Inspired Classroom, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD
  • 2015  University of Maryland, College Park, College Park, MD 
  • 2014  NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD
  • 2014  Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD
  • 2014  NASA Museum Alliance, Greenbelt, MD (interactive webinar)
  • 2013  Combs High School, San Tan Valley, AZ
  • 2012  NASA Lunar Science Institute Podcast
  • 2012  NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC
  • 2011–2016  LRO Educator Workshop, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD
  • Selected Community Contributions

    2018  Science Organizing Committee, SSERVI Exploration Science Forum
    2018  Program Committee, LPSC 49
    2017  LEAG Advances in Science on the Moon - Special Action Team 
    2017  LEAG Next Steps on the Moon - Special Action Team
    2017  Session Chair, “Polar Ice Deposits on Mercury and More,” LPSC 48
    2016  “Conversations with Goddard” interview
    2016  Session Chair, “Lunar Volcanism: New Perspectives on a Dynamic Moon,” LPSC 47
    2016  Panelist, “New Moon Rising – NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter” at DC’s AwesomeCon
    2015–2016  Member, Comparative Volcanology Working Group at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
    2015  Science Organizing Committee, Workshop on Crater Statistics and the Dating of Planetary Surfaces, Laurel, MD
    2015  Session Chair, “Lunar Surface Properties and Processes from a Distance,” LPSC 46
    2014–present  Judge, Steven E. Dwornik Student Award
    2014–present  Peer Review Panelist and External Reviewer, various NASA ROSES programs, including CDAP, DDAP, LDAP, MDAP, NESSF, PDART, PMDAP, SSW, Dawn @ Ceres Guest Investigator Program, OSIRIS-REx Participating Scientist Program, Discovery Program, KPLO (Instrument Proposals; Participating Scientist Programs - for general CV)
    2013–present  Peer Reviewer, multiple peer-reviewed journals, including Icarus (Outstanding Reviewer), Journal of Geophysical Research-Planets, Geophysical Research Letters
    2011–present  Member, Planetary Cratering Consortium Nomenclature Subcommittee 
    2010–2013  Grant Reviewer, ASU Graduate and Professional Student Association
    2009–2011  ASU School of Earth and Space Exploration Graduate Student Council; founding member; Secretary (2009-2010), President (2010-2011).
    2008–present Member/Leader, Next Generation of Lunar Scientists and Engineers
    2008–present Member, Lunar Exploration Analysis Group
    2003–2008  Brown University Space Club; President (2004-2007), Graduate Student Mentor (2007-2008). 
    • 2018  Science Organizing Committee, SSERVI Exploration Science Forum
    • 2018  Program Committee, LPSC 49
    • 2017  LEAG Advances in Science on the Moon - Special Action Team 
    • 2017  LEAG Next Steps on the Moon - Special Action Team
    • 2017  Session Chair, “Polar Ice Deposits on Mercury and More,” LPSC 48
    • 2016  “Conversations with Goddard” interview
    • 2016  Session Chair, “Lunar Volcanism: New Perspectives on a Dynamic Moon,” LPSC 47
    • 2016  Panelist, “New Moon Rising – NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter” at DC’s AwesomeCon
    • 2015–2016  Member, Comparative Volcanology Working Group at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
    • 2015  Science Organizing Committee, Workshop on Crater Statistics and the Dating of Planetary Surfaces, Laurel, MD
    • 2015  Session Chair, “Lunar Surface Properties and Processes from a Distance,” LPSC 46
    • 2014–present  Judge, Steven E. Dwornik Student Award
    • 2014–present  Peer Review Panelist and External Reviewer, various NASA ROSES programs
    • 2013–present  Peer Reviewer, multiple peer-reviewed journals, including Icarus (Outstanding Reviewer), Journal of Geophysical Research-Planets, Geophysical Research Letters
    • 2011–present  Member, Planetary Cratering Consortium Nomenclature Subcommittee 
    • 2010–2013  Grant Reviewer, ASU Graduate and Professional Student Association
    • 2009–2011  ASU School of Earth and Space Exploration Graduate Student Council; founding member; Secretary (2009-2010), President (2010-2011).
    • 2008–present Member, Blogger, Organizer, Women in Planetary Science
    • 2008–present Member, Organizing Committee, Next Generation of Lunar Scientists and Engineers
    • 2008–present Member, Lunar Exploration Analysis Group
    • 2003–2008  Brown University Space Club; President (2004-2007), Graduate Student Mentor (2007-2008)

    Selected Outreach Contributions

    2017  LPSC Microblogger
    2016-present  Letters to a Pre-Scientist Program, writing letters to a middle school penpal interested in STEM
    2016–present  Flagstaff Festival of Science, Science in the Park
    2011–2012  Hands on Science Day at ASU, sponsored by the Association of Women in Science
    2009–present  Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Education and Public Outreach activities
    2009–2013  Contributor, 70+ “Featured Images” outreach blog posts on Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera website
    2009–2013  School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, monthly Astronomy Open House, Prowl & Play at the Phoenix Zoo, Homecoming, SESE Open House
    • 2017  LPSC Microblogger
    • 2016-present  Letters to a Pre-Scientist Program, writing letters to a middle school penpal interested in STEM
    • 2016–present  Flagstaff Festival of Science, Science in the Park
    • 2011–2012  Hands on Science Day at ASU, sponsored by the Association of Women in Science
    • 2009–present  Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Education and Public Outreach activities
    • 2009–2013  Contributor, 70+ “Featured Images” outreach blog posts on Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera website
    • 2009–2013  School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, monthly Astronomy Open House, Prowl & Play at the Phoenix Zoo, Homecoming, SESE Open House

    Professional Publications

    Selected Refereed Journal Articles

    • Byrne, P.K., et al., 2018. The volcanic character of Mercury, in Mercury: The View after MESSENGER, ed. S.C. Solomon, L.R. Nittler, B.J. Anderson, Cambridge University Press, in press.

      Chapman, C.R., et al., 2018. Impact cratering of Mercury, in Mercury: The View after MESSENGER, ed. S.C. Solomon, L.R. Nittler, B.J. Anderson, Cambridge University Press, in press.

      Robbins, S.J., et al., 2018. Measuring impact crater depth throughout the solar system. Meteor. & Planet. Sci., 54, 583–626.

      Povilaitis, R.Z., et al., 2017. Crater density differences: Exploring regional resurfacing, secondary crater populations, and crater saturation equilibrium on the Moon. Planet. Space Sci., in press.

      Byrne, P.K., Ostrach, L.R., et al., 2016. Widespread effusive volcanism on Mercury likely ended by about 3.5 Ga. Geophys. Res. Lett., 43, 7408–7416.

      Ostrach, L.R. et al., 2015. Extent, age, and resurfacing history of the northern smooth plains on Mercury from MESSENGER observations. Icarus 250, 602–622.

      Strom, R.G., et al., 2015. The inner solar system cratering record and the evolution of impactor populations. Res. Astron. Astrophys. 15, 407–434.

      Xiao, Z., et al., 2014. Comparisons of fresh complex impact craters on Mercury and the Moon: Implications for controlling factors in impact excavation processes. Icarus, 228, 260–275.

      Denevi, B.W., et al., 2013. The distribution and origin of smooth plains on Mercury. J. Geophys. Res. Planets 118, 891–907.

      Kumar, P.S. et al., 2013. Gullies on the Moon: Evidence for dry-granular flows, J. Geophys. Res. Planets 118, 206–223.

      Hiesinger, H. et al., 2012. How old are young lunar craters?, J. Geophys. Res. Planets 117, E12.

      Head, J.W., et al., 2011. Flood volcanism in the northern high latitudes of Mercury revealed by MESSENGER. Science 333, 1853–1856.

      Head, J.W., et al., 2009. Evidence for Intrusive Activity on Mercury from the First MESSENGER Flyby. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 285, 251–262.
      Byrne, P.K., et al., 2018. The volcanic character of Mercury, in Mercury: The View after MESSENGER, ed. S.C. Solomon, L.R. Nittler, B.J. Anderson, Cambridge University Press, in press.
    • Chapman, C.R., et al., 2018. Impact cratering of Mercury, in Mercury: The View after MESSENGER, ed. S.C. Solomon, L.R. Nittler, B.J. Anderson, Cambridge University Press, in press.
    • Robbins, S.J., et al., 2018. Measuring impact crater depth throughout the solar system. Meteor. & Planet. Sci., 54, 583–626.
    • Povilaitis, R.Z., et al., 2017. Crater density differences: Exploring regional resurfacing, secondary crater populations, and crater saturation equilibrium on the Moon. Planet. Space Sci., in press.
    • Byrne, P.K., Ostrach, L.R., et al., 2016. Widespread effusive volcanism on Mercury likely ended by about 3.5 Ga. Geophys. Res. Lett., 43, 7408–7416.
    • Ostrach, L.R. et al., 2015. Extent, age, and resurfacing history of the northern smooth plains on Mercury from MESSENGER observations. Icarus 250, 602–622.
    • Strom, R.G., et al., 2015. The inner solar system cratering record and the evolution of impactor populations. Res. Astron. Astrophys. 15, 407–434.
    • Xiao, Z., et al., 2014. Comparisons of fresh complex impact craters on Mercury and the Moon: Implications for controlling factors in impact excavation processes. Icarus, 228, 260–275.
      Denevi, B.W., et al., 2013. The distribution and origin of smooth plains on Mercury. J. Geophys. Res. Planets 118, 891–907.
    • Kumar, P.S. et al., 2013. Gullies on the Moon: Evidence for dry-granular flows, J. Geophys. Res. Planets 118, 206–223.
    • Hiesinger, H. et al., 2012. How old are young lunar craters?, J. Geophys. Res. Planets 117, E12.
    • Head, J.W., et al., 2011. Flood volcanism in the northern high latitudes of Mercury revealed by MESSENGER. Science 333, 1853–1856.
    • Head, J.W., et al., 2009. Evidence for Intrusive Activity on Mercury from the First MESSENGER Flyby. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 285, 251–262.

    Selected First-Author Conference Abstracts

    • Ostrach, L.R., et al., 2018. Update on the geologic map of the Borealis Quadrangle (H-1) on Mercury. Lunar Planet. Sci. 49. Abstract 1747 (poster).
    • Ostrach, L.R., et al., 2018. 2018 update on the geologic map of the Borealis Quadrangle (H-1) on Mercury. Annual Planetary Geologic Mappers Meeting, 12-14 June, University of Tennessee Knoxville, Knoxville, TN. Abstract 7010 (oral and poster).
    • Ostrach, L.R., Dundas, C.M., 2017. Topographic assessment of hollows on Mercury: Distinguishing among formation hypotheses. Lunar Planet. Sci. 48. Abstract 1656 (oral).
    • Ostrach, L.R., et al., 2017. Geologic map of the Borealis Quadrangle (H-1) on Mercury: 2017 Status Report. 3rd Planetary Data Workshop, 12-15 June, Flagstaff, AZ. Abstract 7108 (poster).
    • Ostrach, L.R., et al., 2016. A new look at Copernican and Eratosthenian crater populations on the Moon and assessment of lunar chronology. Lunar Planet. Sci. 47. Abstract 2099 (poster).
    • Ostrach, L.R., et al., 2016. Creation of a new geologic map of the Borealis Quadrangle (H-1) on Mercury. Annual Planetary Geologic Mappers Meeting, 13-15 June, Flagstaff, AZ. Abstract 7019 (oral).
    • Ostrach, L.R., Petro, N.E., 2015. Going with the (debris) flow: Young mass wasting on the Moon, Lunar Planet. Sci. 46. Abstract 1180 (oral).
    • Ostrach, L.R., Singer, K.N., Robinson, M.S., 2015. Non-obvious secondary crater detection on the Moon. Lunar Planet. Sci. 46. Abstract 1082 (poster).
    • Ostrach, L.R., et al., 2015. Detecting non-obvious secondary craters on the Moon. Workshop on Issues in Crater Studies and the Dating of Planetary Surfaces, 19-22 May, Laurel, MD. Abstract 9028 (oral).
    • Ostrach, L.R., Petro, N.E., 2014. Characterization of smooth deposits within South-Pole Aitken Basin: The search for impact melt deposits. NASA Exploration Science Forum 21–23 July, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (oral).
    • Ostrach, L.R., Robinson, M.S., 2014. Areal crater density analysis of volcanic smooth plains: Mare Imbrium, a revised approach. Lunar Planet. Sci. 45. Abstract 1266 (poster).
    • Ostrach, L.R., Robinson, M.S., 2013. Using Crater Size-frequency measurements to distinguish age units within volcanic smooth plains–A new approach, Lunar Plan. Sci. 44, Abstract 1086 (poster).
    • Ostrach, L.R., Robinson, M.S., Denevi, B. W., 2012. Distribution of impact melt on Mercury and the Moon. Lunar Planet. Sci. 43. Abstract 1113 (oral).

    +13 additional first-author abstracts, +55 conference abstracts and +4 white papers/Special Action Team reports as a contributing author