Astrogeology Science Center

The Icy Mountains of Pluto - New close-up images of a region near Pluto's equator reveal a giant surprise: a range of youthful mountains rising as high as 11,000 feet (3,500 meters) above the surface of the icy body. The close-up image was taken about 1.5 hours before New Horizons closest approach to Pluto, using the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) instrument. (Image credit NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute)
The Icy Mountains of Pluto - New close-up images of a region near Pluto's equator reveal a giant surprise: a range of youthful mountains rising as high as 11,000 feet (3,500 meters) above the surface of the icy body. The close-up image was taken about 1.5 hours before New Horizons closest approach to Pluto, using the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) instrument. (Image credit NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute)
Pluto and Charon are shown in enhanced color in this image, which is the highest-resolution color image of the pair so far returned to Earth by New Horizons. The image highlights the contrasting appearance of the two worlds: Charon is mostly gray, with a dark reddish polar cap, while Pluto shows a wide variety of subtle color variation. (Image credit NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute)
Pluto and Charon are shown in enhanced color in this image, which is the highest-resolution color image of the pair so far returned to Earth by New Horizons. The image highlights the contrasting appearance of the two worlds: Charon is mostly gray, with a dark reddish polar cap, while Pluto shows a wide variety of subtle color variation. (Image credit NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute)
This is a montage of New Horizons images of Jupiter and its volcanic moon Io, taken during the spacecraft's Jupiter flyby in early 2007. The Jupiter image was taken by the spacecraft's Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array (LEISA). The Io image was taken by the panchromatic Long-Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI), with color information provided by the Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC). (Image credit NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute/Goddard Space Flight Center)
This is a montage of New Horizons images of Jupiter and its volcanic moon Io, taken during the spacecraft's Jupiter flyby in early 2007. The Jupiter image was taken by the spacecraft's Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array (LEISA). The Io image was taken by the panchromatic Long-Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI), with color information provided by the Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC). (Image credit NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute/Goddard Space Flight Center)
New Horizons launched on Jan. 19, 2006 as part of NASA’s New Frontiers Program. The spacecraft will help scientists back on Earth study the surface and atmosphere of the dwarf planet Pluto, its moons and objects in the Kuiper belt—a region of our solar system beyond Neptune containing tens of thousands of objects. The USGS Astrogeology Science Center is committed to NASA’s New Horizons mission. The USGS ISIS team of scientists and programmers are integral to the development and maintenance of ISIS software, including the MVIC, LORRI and LEISA camera models.