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Actual science tests report

Wednesday, September 13, 2006

FireThese are reputedly real answers to questions on science tests.

When you smell an odorless gas, it is probably carbon monoxide.

Water is composed of two gins, oxygin and hydrogin. Oxygin is pure gin. Hydrogin is gin and water.

Nitrogen is not found in Ireland because it is not found in a free state.

When you breathe, you inspire. When you do not breathe, you expire.

Three kinds of blood vessels are arteries, vanes, and caterpillars.

Before giving a blood transfusion, find out if the blood is affirmative or negative.

The moon is a planet just like the Earth, only it is even deader.

The pistol of a flower is its only protection against insects.

A fossil is an extinct animal. The older it is, the more extinct it is.

For fainting: Rub the person's chest, or, if it's a lady, rub her arm above the hand. Or put her head between the knees of the nearest medical doctor.

Equator: a menagerie lion running around Earth through Africa.

Rhubarb: a kind of celery gone bloodshot.

The skeleton is what is left after the insides have been taken out and the outsides have been taken off. The purpose of the skeleton is so that there is something to hitch the meat to.

To remove dust from the eye, pull the eye down over the nose.

The body consists of three parts - the brainium, the borax and the abominable cavity. The brainium contains the brain. The borax contains the heart and lungs, and the abominable cavity contains the bowels, of which there are five - A, E, I, O, and U.

credit:AHAJOKES.com

A snapshot of Titan

Tuesday, September 12, 2006

T-17 Flyby
T-17 Flyby -- Raw Image N00065334
Image Credit: NASA/JPL
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N00065334.jpg was received on Earth, Sept. 8, 2006. The camera was pointing toward TITAN at approximately 137,854 kilometers away, using the CL1 and CB3 filters. The image reportedly has not been validated or calibrated. A validated/calibrated image is expected to be archived with the NASA Planetary Data System in 2007.

Hubble Captures a Rare Eclipse on Uranus

Tuesday, September 12, 2006

Uranus Eclipse
Arial traverses Uranus
click for larger image

This NASA Hubble Space Telescope image is a never-before-seen astronomical alignment of a moon traversing the face of Uranus, and its accompanying shadow. The white dot near the center of Uranus’ blue-green disk is the icy moon Ariel. The 700-mile-diameter satellite is casting a shadow onto the cloud tops of Uranus. To an observer on Uranus, this would appear as a solar eclipse, where the moon briefly blocks out the Sun as its shadow races across Uranus’s cloud tops. Though such "transits" by moons across the disks of their parents are commonplace for some other gas giant planets, such as Jupiter, the satellites of Uranus orbit the planet in such a way that they rarely cast shadows on the planet's surface. Uranus is tilted so that its spin axis lies nearly in its orbital plane. The planet is essentially tipped over on its side. The moons of Uranus orbit the planet above the equator, so their paths align edge-on to the Sun only every 42 years. This color composite image was created from images at three wavelengths in near infrared light obtained with Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys on July 26, 2006. Dr. Kathy Rages, of the SETI Institute, made the identification of the bright spot as Ariel.

Credit: NASA, ESA, L. Sromovsky (University of Wisconsin, Madison), H. Hammel (Space Science Institute), and K. Rages (SETI)

SMART-1 hits the Moon

Wednesday, September 6, 2006

LUNAR FLASH: As planned, Europe's SMART-1 spacecraft crashed into the Moon this morning, Sept. 3rd, at 0542 UT. The resulting flash was too faint for most backyard telescopes, but a team of astronomers using the big 3.6m CFHT telescope in Hawaii did manage to photograph the explosion.

Visit http://spaceweather.com for updates and images.

Pluto joined by two "new" members of the dwarf planet club

Wednesday, August 30, 2006

Pluto
Artist's rendering of Pluto with the Sun in the background
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Pluto, formerly known as the ninth planet of our solar system, has been reclassified to a new category called "dwarf planet." The vote by the International Astronomical Union officially upgrades Earth's neighborhood from the traditional nine planets to eleven -- eight classical planets, and three dwarf planets. The eight classical planets of our solar system are: Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. Pluto, Ceres, and 2003 UB313 (temporary name) are the first members of the new "dwarf planet" category.

Clyde Tombaugh at Flagstaff's Lowell Observatory discovered Pluto in 1930. Pluto's designation as a dwarf planet was caused by the new rule, which says a planet must orbit the sun and be large enough to assume a nearly round shape, and must "clear the neighborhood around its orbit." Pluto's oblong orbits overlap Neptune's.

Nevertheless NASA plans to carry on with its New Horizons spacecraft mission, which in January 2006 began a journey to the dwarf planet and its moon, Charon whether Pluto is a planet or not. The seven science instruments on the piano-sized New Horizons probe will shed light on Pluto’s surface properties, geology, interior makeup and atmospheres.

For more information about the IAU ruling, see the IAU 2006 General Assembly: Result of the IAU Resolution votes.

The Meaning of Planet

Wednesday, August 16, 2006

What is a planet? For years, astronomers have been debating that question, with the status of tiny Pluto hanging in the balance. Finally, an answer is in the offing. Today, the International Astronomical Union's Planet Definition Committee announced their proposal for a new, official definition of "planet." If the proposal is approved by a vote of IAU astronomers on August 24th, the number of planets in the Solar System would swell from nine to twelve. And, yes, Pluto would be among them. Get the full story at http://spaceweather.com .

Upcoming Happenings at Lowell Observatory

Tuesday, August 15, 2006

Slipher Building Rotunda
Visitors enjoy observing at portable telescopes and touring the Observatory's Slipher Building Rotunda museum during a special evening event, 2006. Photo: Jeremy Perez
UPCOMING SPECIALS

Sept. 3, 2006
(Sunday evening)


Labor Day Weekend Star Fest
(evening) – Lowell Observatory will celebrate the holiday weekend with a special Star Fest. This event will feature numerous telescopes set up for viewing throughout the Lowell campus and indoor exhibits and presentations. Doors open at 7:30 p.m.


Sept. 6, 2006
(Weds. evening)
Flagstaff Night (evening) – Flagstaff residents (must show valid drivers license or utility bill) pay only half price for entrance into the Observatory's evening programs. Doors open at 7:30 p.m.

Orion's Inner Beauty

Tuesday, August 15, 2006

Sword of Orion
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This infrared image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the Orion nebula, our closest massive star-making factory, 1,450 light-years from Earth. The nebula is close enough to appear to the naked eye as a fuzzy star in the sword of the popular hunter constellation.

The nebula itself is located on the lower half of the image, surrounded by a ring of dust. It formed in a cold cloud of gas and dust and contains about 1,000 young stars. These stars illuminate the cloud, creating the beautiful nebulosity, or swirls of material, seen here in infrared.

This image shows infrared light captured by Spitzer's infrared array camera. Light with wavelengths of 8 and 5.8 microns (red and orange) comes mainly from dust that has been heated by starlight. Light of 4.5 microns (green) shows hot gas and dust; and light of 3.6 microns (blue) is from starlight.

Take a look or download Orion's Portrait at medium or high resolution.

Credit: NASA-Spitzer Space Telescope

Universe Might be Bigger and Older than Expected

Thursday, August 10, 2006

A project aiming to create an easier way to measure cosmic distances has instead turned up surprising evidence that our large and ancient universe might be even bigger and older than previously thought.

If accurate, the finding would be difficult to mesh with current thinking about how the universe evolved, one scientist said.

A research team led by Alceste Bonanos at the Carnegie Institution of Washington has found that the Triangulum Galaxy, also known as M33, is about 15 percent farther away from our own Milky Way than previously calculated.

The finding, which will be detailed in an upcoming issue of Astrophysical Journal, suggests that the Hubble constant, a number that measures the expansion rate and age of the universe, is actually 15 percent smaller than other studies have found.

Currently, most astronomers agree that the value of the Hubble constant is about 71 kilometers per second per megaparsec (a megaparsec is 3.2 million light-years). If this value were smaller by 15 percent, then the universe would be older and bigger by this amount as well.

Scientists now estimate the universe to be about 13.7 billion years old (a figure that has seemed firm since 2003, based on measurements of radiation leftover from the Big Bang) and about 156 billion light-years wide.

The new finding implies that the universe is instead about 15.8 billion years old and about 180 billion light-years wide.

credit:Space.com, Ken Than More:Universe Might be Bigger and Older than Expected

Huygens Scientific Archive data set released

Thursday, August 10, 2006

Access to the Huygens archive is available via the ESA Planetary Science Archive (PSA). NASA’s Cassini spacecraft orbited Saturn for four years, surveying the ringed planet and its moons. The ESA Huygens probe was first to land on the surface of Titan, Saturn’s largest moon. Data from Cassini and Huygens was intended to offer clues about how life began on Earth.

The data sets include calibration information and documentation necessary to understand and process the products, and to carry out scientific analyses. It is available to scientist as well as the public for download and is also available in the NASA Planetary Data System (PDS).

"This achievement is the result of a major effort performed during the last three years by all the Huygens teams, scientists and engineers, from Europe and the United States," outlines Olivier Witasse, ESA planetary scientist.


Learn more about the data, valuable contacts, questions and feedback related to the archive.

REU Student Talks Tomorrow

Tuesday, August 8, 2006

Ajay Limaye
Ajay Limaye, REU student working on Mars research at the USGS Astrogeology Research Program.

Everyone is invited to the Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU), student talks this coming Wednesday morning, August 9, starting at 9:00 a.m. in room 321, of the Physical Sciences Building at Northern Arizona University (NAU). Talks such as Potential Nested Craters on Mars, Spectroscopy of Kuniper Belt Objects, Irregular Galaxies using UV Photometry, and many more interesting subjects are on the agenda.

Ajay Limaye, a student working under Mentor, Ken Tanaka, at USGS, Branch of Astrogeology, will be presenting Leading Mars Science Lab to Layers: The Hunt for Aqueous Sedimentary Deposits. Ajay says," I'm doing this to get an idea of what it's like to jump into active planetary research." Ajay is currently a senior at UC-Berkeley majoring in Earth and Planetary Science.

Doughnuts and coffee will be served at 8:30. The talks are opened to the public.

Meteor Shower Friday (7/28/2006)

Tuesday, July 25, 2006

This week, Earth is passing through a meteoroid stream from--where? Its source is unknown. Every year in late July, the mystery stream produces a mild but pretty meteor shower, the Southern Delta Aquarids. The best time to look is Friday morning, July 28th. These meteors tend to be faint, so dark country skies are recommended.

Visit SpaceWeather.com for sky maps and more information.

USGS in the News

Monday, July 17, 2006

Star Tales
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Hear the interview! Interview with author Gerald Schaber (MP3 audio, 17MB)

Crop Circle Humor

Monday, July 17, 2006

Crop circles
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Star Shade Could Reveal Earthlike Exoplanets

Monday, July 17, 2006

Star shade
Image: © AMY LO
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Stars shine so brightly that any planets orbiting them are lost in the glow. In fact, astronomers can only detect exoplanets indirectly by their effects on parent stars: either gravitational or, as the planet passes in front, by dimming. But a 50-meter-wide, daisy-shaped star shade could block stellar light, allowing direct observation of their planets, according to a new paper in today's Nature.

Webster Cash of the University of Colorado designed the star shade to be used in conjunction with orbiting telescopes. The thin plastic shade would cancel out a specific star's light and the telescope--trailing 15,000 miles behind--could then take in light from its distant planets. "Think of an outfielder holding up one hand to block out the sunlight as he tracks a fly ball," Cash explains. "We would use the star shade as a giant hand to suppress the light emanating from a central star by a factor of about 10 billion."

Read More: Scientific American.com -Star Shade Could Reveal Earthllike Exoplanets